AUTUMN LEAVES PRODUCED BY JOHNSON BROTHERS 

Johnson Brothers were contracted by Marks & Spencer to manufacture the basic tableware range. For many years they also produced cookware but in later years the cookware was made by T.G. Green.

Tea cup and matching saucer.

 Mark1 - original large, shallow cup.

Mark2 - straight sided, deeper cup.

 

Mark3 - traditional shaped cup.

 

The mystery of the missing leaf! 

The above cream jug and teacup are some of the earliest known pieces of Autumn Leaves.

Compare them with the slightly later issues, shown below, and you may just notice that one tiny yellow leaf is missing, immediately adjacent to the large flower. But why? What provoked this subtle diminution of a pattern that was to continue to be used on various items for many years to come?

 

Above, the same jugs and cups, illustrating the missing leaf.

Below, further views of the cream jug with, and without, the illusive leaf. Early versions of mugs and sugar basins should also exist with the extra leaf. Confirmation of this would be greatly appreciated...

 

 

Deep Oval Casserole. Note that the pattern used on the side is the same as that used for the lid, except that the uppermost flower has been snipped off! The full version of this pattern was also used briefly on a medium planter and two different shapes of large teapot. As far as we are aware this pattern variation was not utilized for any other item. 

 

Shallow Round Casserole.

 

Early version of Flan Dish.

 

Large Oval Dish. A similar dish exists with patterns on exterior sides only.( See T.G.Green page.) Johnson Brothers also made a large rectangular dish, again with a pattern inside the dish.

 

 

Original Pie Dish with fluted sides.

 

Large Oval Plate.

 

Above, original Salt and Pepper pots. Below, replacement version.

 

Towards the end of its production of Autumn Leaves, Johnson Brothers began to 'stretch' the design when placing it on cups, jugs, gravy boats etc. This 'stretching' should be discernible on the above, right, salt pot. The same stretching can be seen if you compare the mark 2 and 3 tea cups shown below. Any information as to why this was instigated would be appreciated...

 

Below, typical packaging used for Marks & Spencer stores.

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